Photo of Shruti Rajan

Partner in the Financial Regulation Practice at the Mumbai office of Cyril Amarchand Mangaldas. Shruti's expertise in financial regulation spans across market entry/innovation, ongoing compliance issues, transactional advisory as well as internal investigations and regulatory representations, with a special emphasis on regulatory issues in relation to RBI and SEBI regulated intermediaries. She can be reached at shruti.rajan@cyrilshroff.com.

India has historically been an economy driven by cash. With unique population demographics and modest literacy levels, it is a difficult market to “digitalise”. However, over the past decade, urban India has seen a significant rise in the use of pre-paid cards, mobile banking, internet wallets and e-payment instruments, in their various guises. They have created a relevant market of their own.

However, in the past few months, and as a consequence of the recent demonetisation, India has been witnessing a new wave of financial technology, with the introduction of innovative products and a wider customer base. Increased penetration has also compelled both the regulators and government to renew their focus on this migration to a “cashless” society. Consequently, the regulatory framework governing e-commerce and financial technology has seen various amendments recently.

Payment Systems in India

In India, the payment and settlement systems are regulated by the Reserve Bank of India (RBI), which exercises oversight over this market. Payment systems are required to obtain authorisation from the RBI to enable payment between a payer and a beneficiary; and while effecting such payment, they should provide payment, clearing and/or settlement services. Set out below are the key payment systems covered under the regulatory framework.

Continue Reading Payment Systems – The Digitalisation of Financial Services and its Future

One of the key tenets of effective corporate governance is the ability of a corporation to promote transparency. Transparency and accountability is strengthened not just by efficient management and robust disclosure policies, but also by the creation of systems and processes to detect and address internal instances of fraud and corruption.

Whistleblowing has always played a distinct role in making companies alert to, and mindful of, employee conduct as well as internal processes and procedures. The existence of this class of facilitators is well recognised in the Indian legislative framework. Under section 177(9) of the Companies Act, 2013, it is mandatory for every listed company to establish a vigilant mechanism for directors and employees. Furthermore, the revised clause 49 of the listing agreement mandates that the company must establish a whistleblower mechanism with adequate safeguards against victimisation of whistleblowers.

Whilst immensely beneficial, tipping off/whistleblowing comes with its own set of unique challenges for the company, the alleged wrongdoer as well as whistleblowers themselves. While there is no ‘one size fits all’, certain aspects, as detailed below, should be considered by any company seeking to establish a whistleblower mechanism: Continue Reading Who Can Hear The Whistle Blow? Whistleblowing And Its Impact On Corporate Governance In India