alternative investment funds

The rise of domestic capital in alternative asset space requires the AIF Regulatory Platform be made available to In-house Funds

The Indian growth story has been propelled by alternative asset classes that witnessed an unprecedented inflow of domestic and foreign capital in the last few years. Alternative Investment Funds (“AIFs”) have played an essential role in this and have raised, as on June 30, 2022[1], a whopping INR 6,94,520 crore (Indian Rupees Six lakh ninety-four thousand and five hundred twenty crore), of which actual deployed capital stands at INR 3,11,343 crore (Indian Rupees Three lakh eleven thousand and three hundred forty-three crore). These numbers are up from INR 2,90,339 crore (Indian Rupees Two lakh ninety thousand and three hundred thirty-nine crore) of capital raised and INR 1,19,758 crore (Indian Rupees One lakh nineteen thousand and seven hundred fifty-eight crore) of actual capital deployed, as on June 30, 2019[2]. Securities and Exchange Board of India (“SEBI”), being the capital market regulator in India, has played an active role in streamlining the AIF industry. SEBI’s proactive and investor-friendly approach is often reflected in the discourses with market participants as well as in the guidelines / circulars / regulations issued for the AIF industry.Continue Reading An Argument for In-house Alternative Investment Funds

SEBI amends FPI Regulations to permit registration of AIFs in IFSC with resident sponsors managers as FPIs

Previously, RBI had permitted Indian entities to make mandatory sponsor commitment to AIFs in IFSC under the ‘automatic route’

Introduction

Alternative Investment Funds (“AIFs”) set up in an International Financial Services Centre (“IFSC”) are required to register themselves as Foreign Portfolio Investors (“FPIs”), for being able to invest inter alia in securities listed on Indian stock exchanges or in specific listed or unlisted corporate debt securities of Indian companies. Since entities set up in IFSCs are equivalent to ‘non-residents’ for the purposes of Indian foreign exchange regulations, restrictions placed by Securities Exchange Board of India (“SEBI”) and the Reserve Bank of India (“RBI”) on participation of Indian residents in FPIs are, by default, applicable to AIFs in IFSC. Considering that AIFs may be set up by managers/ sponsors who are resident Indian entities and that the SEBI (Alternative Investment Funds) Regulations, 2012 (“AIF Regulations”), require managers/ sponsors of AIFs to make mandatory sponsor commitment[1] to the AIF, it is imperative that the restrictions on residents investing in FPIs do not conflict with the mandatory sponsor commitment requirements under AIF Regulations, as applicable to AIFs in IFSC.Continue Reading SEBI amends FPI Regulations to permit registration of AIFs in IFSC with resident sponsors/ managers as FPIs

SEBI Notifies Renewed Process for PPM Filing by AIFs

PPM filings will now be based on due diligence by merchant bankers

I.  Introduction

The Securities and Exchange Board of India (“SEBI”) at its board meeting held on August 6, 2021, announced a wide array of changes to the regulatory regime governing alternative investment funds (“AIFs”) in India. We had analysed the amendments and their effect in a prior regulatory update. Amongst the changes announced was a procedural update. The securities regulator had mandated that all private placement memoranda (“PPM”), the offer document shared with potential investors in an AIF, must be filed with it through a merchant banker.Continue Reading SEBI Notifies Renewed Process for PPM Filing by AIFs

SEBI Regulatory Update

There have been significant changes to the regulatory regime governing alternative investment funds (“AIFs”)[1] in the past year and a half. In its Board Meeting dated August 06, 2021, the Securities and Exchange Board of India (“SEBI”) approved a fresh set of amendments to the SEBI (Alternative Investment Funds) Regulations, 2012 (“AIF Regulations”), governing AIFs, intended to ease compliance requirements, provide greater investment flexibility and streamline regulatory processes. A regulatory circular giving effect to these proposed amendments is awaited.Continue Reading SEBI Regulatory Update : Proposed Amendments to AIF Regulations

Funds in GIFT City - FAQs & Structuring Insights Blog

 A. Introduction

Gujarat International Fin-Tec City (“GIFT City”) is being developed as a global financial and IT Services hub on the lines of globally benchmarked financial centres. It includes a Special Economic Zone having the status of an International Finance Services Centre (“IFSC”). The IFSC is set up to undertake financial services transactions that are currently carried out outside India by overseas financial institutions and overseas branches/ subsidiaries of Indian financial institutions. 
Continue Reading Funds in GIFT City – FAQs & Structuring Insights

Year 2020 in Review - The Funds Perspective

Remembering the year 2020 could easily turn one pensive. The year posed unprecedented challenges for the funds industry, driving-forth fundamental changes in the manner business would be conducted alongside the pandemic. The year also marked an important milestone in the ever-evolving regulatory landscape, with several amendments critical for funds and fund managers being rolled out.Continue Reading Year 2020 in Review: The Funds Perspective

 RAISING CROSS-BORDER DEBT – THE INDIAN AND US EXPERIENC

CAM authors collaborate for this article with our Guest Authors –  Michael J. Cochran, Partner at Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton and Gabrielle Gollomp , Associate at Dentons

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India

Over the last decade, alternatives to traditional bank lending have emerged to service the debt requirements of Indian corporates. With Indian banks and non-bank companies facing stress (due to rising bad debt levels), Indian corporations are increasingly looking to tap into foreign debt sources. The development of offshore loan and debt markets can also be attributed to the operation of the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code, 2016, which accords significant powers to creditors of debt-ridden Indian companies to restructure and resolve bad debts.
Continue Reading Raising Cross-Border Debt – The Indian and US Experience

Foreign Portfolio Investor - Corporate Debt - Voluntary Retention Route

As the Indian economy has grown over the years, so have the means of raising foreign debt by Indian companies. What began with limited investment channels for foreign banks and certain qualified institutional investors, has now flourished into a robust foreign debt investment market. Based on the commercial considerations driving a deal, Indian corporates can now raise ECBs under multiple tracks, issue various kinds of rupee denominated bonds, or avail of monies through fund structures such as alternative investment funds (AIFs) and real estate investment trusts (REITs).

Added to this mix is the foreign portfolio investment (FPI) route. What sets FPI apart is the degree of commercial flexibility it accords to investors and companies. For example, end-use and pricing norms applicable to FPI investments are relatively relaxed. Because of this, FPI is often the preferred option for raising debt, particularly short-term debt and working capital funding requirements.[1]
Continue Reading Investment through the Voluntary Retention Route: Fresh Push for FPI in Corporate Debt?