DB of DHC sets the contours of Pre-grant opponent in an examination process

In a recent case[1], Novartis AG[2] v. Natco Pharma Ltd.[3], the Division Bench (DB) of the Delhi High Court (DHC) adjudicated on the extent of engagement a pre-grant opponent should be allowed under the Patents Act, 1970, in the course of proceedings initiated by the Controller, requiring the patent applicant to amend or modify the patent application.Continue Reading DB of DHC sets the contours of Pre-grant opponent in an examination process

Pharmaceutical and Healthcare

Since the inception of the ‘world wide web’, no other technology in the digital space has caught the attention of the world quite like ‘blockchain’. It has the potential to be a gamechanger with its promise of unmatched data security. Even though the implementation/ application of blockchain’s much-coveted underlying technology into various other industries has been a very recent phenomenon, the learned are already prophesising about  its ability  to shepherd us into a completely new way of network interactions and data storage. This future reality has been nick-named  ‘Web3’.Continue Reading Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Industry: A Case for Regulation Through Blockchain

Cabinet Approves Major Changes in FDI Policy

On January 10, 2018, the Indian Cabinet gave its approval to a number of major amendments to the Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) Policy of India, to further liberalise and simplify the same. This is to increase the ease of doing business in the country, and continue to attract much needed foreign capital to fuel India’s growth. In this post, we examine the latest amendments and their impact on the crucial sectors involved therein.

Key Reforms

Single Brand Retail Trading (SBRT)

The latest amendment has brought sweeping changes in FDI norms for SBRT, thereby enticing significant foreign brands into India’s promising retail space.

The current FDI Policy on SBRT allows 49% FDI under the automatic route, and FDI beyond that and up to 100% through the Government approval route. Earlier, a sourcing norm was also attached to such an investment. This meant that investors were required to source 30% of the value of goods purchased for their Indian businesses through local sources. Several investors have had to spend a significant amount of time developing good local suppliers as partners and their inability to procure locally proved a major stumbling block in setting up their business in India.Continue Reading Cabinet Approves Major Changes in FDI Policy